summer eyes

the-clockmakers-daughter:


Books you Need to Read: 5/?

The Tropic of Serpants - a Memoir by Lady Trent by Marrie Brennan

 Attentive readers of Lady Trent’s earlier memoir, A Natural History of Dragons, are already familiar with how a bookish and determined young woman named Isabella first set out on the historic course that would one day lead her to becoming the world’s premier dragon naturalist. Now, in this remarkably candid second volume, Lady Trent looks back at the next stage of her illustrious (and occasionally scandalous) career.
 Three years after her fateful journeys through the forbidding mountains of Vystrana, Mrs. Camherst defies family and convention to embark on an expedition to the war-torn continent of Eriga, home of such exotic draconian species as the grass-dwelling snakes of the savannah, arboreal tree snakes, and, most elusive of all, the legendary swamp-wyrms of the tropics. 
The expedition is not an easy one. Accompanied by both an old associate and a runaway heiress, Isabella must brave oppressive heat, merciless fevers, palace intrigues, gossip, and other hazards in order to satisfy her boundless fascination with all things draconian, even if it means venturing deep into the forbidden jungle known as the Green Hell … where her courage, resourcefulness, and scientific curiosity will be tested as never before.

Personal Review 

To Come… I have not read the Book yet. 

- The Clockmakers Daughter

the-clockmakers-daughter:

Books you Need to Read: 5/?

The Tropic of Serpants - a Memoir by Lady Trent by Marrie Brennan

 Attentive readers of Lady Trent’s earlier memoir, A Natural History of Dragons, are already familiar with how a bookish and determined young woman named Isabella first set out on the historic course that would one day lead her to becoming the world’s premier dragon naturalist. Now, in this remarkably candid second volume, Lady Trent looks back at the next stage of her illustrious (and occasionally scandalous) career.

Three years after her fateful journeys through the forbidding mountains of Vystrana, Mrs. Camherst defies family and convention to embark on an expedition to the war-torn continent of Eriga, home of such exotic draconian species as the grass-dwelling snakes of the savannah, arboreal tree snakes, and, most elusive of all, the legendary swamp-wyrms of the tropics.

The expedition is not an easy one. Accompanied by both an old associate and a runaway heiress, Isabella must brave oppressive heat, merciless fevers, palace intrigues, gossip, and other hazards in order to satisfy her boundless fascination with all things draconian, even if it means venturing deep into the forbidden jungle known as the Green Hell … where her courage, resourcefulness, and scientific curiosity will be tested as never before.

Personal Review 

To Come… I have not read the Book yet. 

- The Clockmakers Daughter

the-clockmakers-daughter:


Books you Need to Read: 4/?

A Natural History of Dragons - A Memoir by Lady Trent by Marrie Brennan

You, dear reader, continue at your own risk. It is not for the faint of heart—no more so than the study of dragons itself. But such study offers rewards beyond compare: to stand in a dragon’s presence, even for the briefest of moments—even at the risk of one’s life—is a delight that, once experienced, can never be forgotten… . 
All the world, from Scirland to the farthest reaches of Eriga, know Isabella, Lady Trent, to be the world’s preeminent dragon naturalist. She is the remarkable woman who brought the study of dragons out of the misty shadows of myth and misunderstanding into the clear light of modern science. But before she became the illustrious figure we know today, there was a bookish young woman whose passion for learning, natural history, and, yes, dragons defied the stifling conventions of her day. 
Here at last, in her own words, is the true story of a pioneering spirit who risked her reputation, her prospects, and her fragile flesh and bone to satisfy her scientific curiosity; of how she sought true love and happiness despite her lamentable eccentricities; and of her thrilling expedition to the perilous mountains of Vystrana, where she made the first of many historic discoveries that would change the world forever. 

Personal Review 

This book is written by an amazing author with a wonderful set of ideas. It’s not the most exciting book in the world, but the concepts and plot are interesting to read. I’ve yet to see a book written in this sense and although I have not finished the book yet, I love it so much that I have put the sister book (The Tropic of Serpents) on my summer reading list as well! 
If you love dragons and history, along with a mix of biology, this book is sure to intrigue! 

- The Clockmakers Daughter

the-clockmakers-daughter:

Books you Need to Read: 4/?

A Natural History of Dragons - A Memoir by Lady Trent by Marrie Brennan

You, dear reader, continue at your own risk. It is not for the faint of heart—no more so than the study of dragons itself. But such study offers rewards beyond compare: to stand in a dragon’s presence, even for the briefest of moments—even at the risk of one’s life—is a delight that, once experienced, can never be forgotten… .

All the world, from Scirland to the farthest reaches of Eriga, know Isabella, Lady Trent, to be the world’s preeminent dragon naturalist. She is the remarkable woman who brought the study of dragons out of the misty shadows of myth and misunderstanding into the clear light of modern science. But before she became the illustrious figure we know today, there was a bookish young woman whose passion for learning, natural history, and, yes, dragons defied the stifling conventions of her day.

Here at last, in her own words, is the true story of a pioneering spirit who risked her reputation, her prospects, and her fragile flesh and bone to satisfy her scientific curiosity; of how she sought true love and happiness despite her lamentable eccentricities; and of her thrilling expedition to the perilous mountains of Vystrana, where she made the first of many historic discoveries that would change the world forever. 

Personal Review 

This book is written by an amazing author with a wonderful set of ideas. It’s not the most exciting book in the world, but the concepts and plot are interesting to read. I’ve yet to see a book written in this sense and although I have not finished the book yet, I love it so much that I have put the sister book (The Tropic of Serpents) on my summer reading list as well!

If you love dragons and history, along with a mix of biology, this book is sure to intrigue! 

- The Clockmakers Daughter

nicolascageholocaust:

We can only be friends if you’re kind of an asshole. Not full blown asshole because that’s no fun. And if you’re not an asshole at all then that won’t work either. A halfway asshole. Those are my kind of people.

(via garnunkle-screwt)

kialna:

I’m no nightvale listener, but this has been something I’ve been saying for more than 10 years. Sometimes the most logical thing is to believe there’s no such thing as coincidence.

kialna:

I’m no nightvale listener, but this has been something I’ve been saying for more than 10 years. Sometimes the most logical thing is to believe there’s no such thing as coincidence.

(Source: sickassbonedragon)

bigtimebellydance:

I am an artist as well as a bellydancer; so when two of my most favorite realms combine, I am absolutely thrilled. ^_^

These are all from the same site where I found my Odalisque image; which I found a few days after posting her- during a stint of further site investigation. ^_^  This is merely a selection of a few of my favorites from the same “Orientalism” page, as there were soooo many pretties, it was hard to choose!  

..I’m not sure why so many of them are topless.. (maybe some Westerners’ images of the bellydancer in each varying era, or perhaps artists’ desires being projected onto their models..?), but as long as you’re not offended by bare, beautiful, curves, I’d highly recommend you surf on over to Onok-Art.  They have TONS GORGEOUS, classical, bellydance-based pieces over there! ^_^

Soon there will be posts w/other more modern belly-art featured (including a few works by yours truly), but for now, I hope you enjoy these period pieces. :)  Woohoo for the great art masters! :D

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

(via garnunkle-screwt)